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I do not necessarily agree with all views expressed on some of the websites that are referenced below, but I do agree with the approaches to the situation espoused by the websites or with what they make available for dealing with what is going on. 

I will note that I agree with most financial viewpoints expressed on the websites, but it is less likely that I agree with all political viewpoints expressed on some of them, mainly because some of them are highly partisan and I am not. 

(Please do not hold me personally accountable for my designation of whether they are partisan or not - I have not exhaustively checked out all of them and I cannot be sure about some.  I have done my best to provide indications below.)


http://www.ElliottWave.com
   (not partisan, except to some extent in a libertarian way - it is a market analysis company,
    focusing on that, but the founder is libertarian/independent and the stated viewpoints of the company reflect that)
http://www.hsdent.com   (not partisan)
http://www.remcmaster.com/   (definitely highly partisan – Republican;
                                                   a market forecasting company, providing a huge amount of
                                                   futures trading information every day, but also covers other
                                                   issues having to do with the state of the world and does so
                                                   from a highly Republican perspective, although with a strong
                                                   independent streak in some cases)
http://www.mises.org

http://zfacts.com/p/461.html   (highly partisan - Democrat)
   (I listed this one so you can get an idea of how quickly the national debt is increasing)
http://www.usdebtclock.org    (non-partisan, it is just a table)
   (The reason why I list this one second, even though it is
     actually closer to the national debt as officially listed at
     the link below than the one above, is because this one is
     so busy, has so many numbers on it, that it is hard to read
     overall, even though the most important numbers are in
     larger print in the upper left-hand corner.  But you are
     welcome to use it if the busyness does not bother you.)

http://www.treasurydirect.gov/NP/BPDLogin?application=np
   (I listed this one because it is the official Treasury web page on which you can see exactly how much national debt is officially owed - but the website is updated manually and not often enough to get a good sense of how quickly the debt is increasing in real-time, which is mainly due to compounding these days; the debt number is close to the one on the first site above, and even closer to the second site above, but the TreasuryDirect website is the government's own official one so you get an exact number of the actual amount of debt owed on any given day; Note - the number can go down, I assume that is when payments come in; On the other websites above, the number basically just keeps going up, I assume that is because the base number is updated only rarely, but the fact of the matter is that overall, the national debt just keeps going up over time, just that the TreasuryDirect website shows more granularity along the way, but the other websites, above, show the rate of compounding better, but the debt does get paid down from time to time, the problem is that the debt is compounding so quickly in the meantime that the paydowns have not much effect anymore, the debt gets right back up there again, and beyond there too, very quickly.)

Safe Wealth Group - this is not a link because the company does not do business through the internet.  it is a wealth preservation company in Switzerland for wealthy clients that was made known to me by Elliott Wave International.  It provides access to very safe international banks that are available only to people who can deal with account minimums in the hundreds of thousands of dollars. 

If you want to find out about the safest banks in America, go to the Elliott Wave International website http://www.conquerthecrash.com and go to the Reader Resources tab.  You will find links there that will tell you about the safest banks in America as well as the two safest banks in each state.  Unfortunately, there are not many really safe banks in America and the truly safest banks are all outside of America. 

Some of the information about safe banks in America on the Conquer the Crash website comes from Weiss Research, http://www.safemoneyreport.com , which is now http://www.moneyandmarkets.com .  That organization in particular publishes information about weak banks in America, as well as some other very useful information.  But please bear in mind that Dr. Weiss has been just as wrong as Mr. Prechter about predicting when the big downturn would come because he does not know about the law against recessions.  (How do I know that both men have been wrong for a long time, basically since the end of the 1980's/beginning of the 1990's?  Because I have known about both men, and their companies, for many years, as I recall in both cases since about the early-to-mid 1980's.)  Unfortunately, all my efforts to make the law against recessions known to other people who already publish financial information have fallen on deaf ears, apparently because all the other people have been publishing for a long time already and are very set in their ways of thinking.  Every time I have tried to make the law against recessions known to someone who already published financial information before I started doing so, I have been completely ignored, they just go about their business as if nothing has changed from their point of view. 

If you want to have more information about bank ratings in America, as well as other financial institutions in America, you can go to http://www.weissratings.com , which can also be accessed by clicking the Weiss Ratings entry on the menu at the top of http://www.moneyandmarkets.com

http://www.sovereignsociety.com   (at least somewhat partisan - Republican)

The Sovereign Society also provides recommendations for banks, but the recommended banks are all in Europe.